Best Materials for Your Bathroom Floor Tiles

Here are some articles that will help you decide as to which materials are the best for the bathroom floor tiles:

Kind of Bathroom Floor Tiles

Bathroom Floor Tiles – wood tile floor, Wood is only to fear. After the water to penetrate the end, and will distort, and perhaps forever. During installation, tile parquet wood should be closed carefully around the room and in all other joints. Then should be applied two coats of polyurethane as a protection. Used in the powder room, but avoid tile laminate flooring in the bathroom fully get a great benefit. Find More…

Which is the Best Floor Tile for Your Bath?

Bathroom floor tile is available in a surprising number of materials. Ceramic, porcelain and vinyl tiles are what come to mind first, and for good reason. They are the most popular choices and perhaps the most practical. But there are many options available today, from wood and cork to stone and glass. Here is a quick guide to help you determine the best floor tile for your bath. Find More…

Be Sensible When Selecting Floor Tiles Kitchen, Bathroom Or Bedroom

When selecting flooring for the different rooms of a house there are certain things to keep in mind. For practical purposes it makes sense to have different types of flooring in different rooms and you will find that most people go for carpets in the bedroom, laminate or wood in the lounge and vinyl flooring kitchen and bathroom. The kitchen is often the busiest place in the home and you want something which is attractive and easy to maintain. Kitchen vinyl flooring and vinyl kitchen floor tiles are popular and often selected over other types of floor tiles kitchens can have. Find More…

VIDEO:How to Tile a Bathroom

Bathroom Floor Tile: 14 Top Options

Stone Tiles

Made from limestone, marble, granite and slate, stone tiles are available in colors that range from cream and blue to red, green, and gold. Available textures are nearly as numerous and include cleft, tumbled, sandblasted, etched and flamed variations. Stone requires more maintenance than ceramic tile; regular cleaning and sealing is recommended. Find More…

How To Install Floor Tile

Installing a floor tile can be time-consuming work. For those on a busy schedule, it can take a week to get the whole project accomplished. However, the process itself is straightforward and the end result is well worth the effort you put in. Here are some helpful steps on how to install a floor tile:

How To Install Ceramic and Porcelain Floor Tile

Once your surface is prepared, you will need to lay out the tiles on the floor before they are installed. No matter what kind of tile you are installing, the layout procedures will generally be the same. The keys to success in tiling are the guide or layout lines. They show you where to start laying the tile and are arranged so the tile is evenly centered in the room.

Layout lines must be square otherwise you will end up with odd-shaped tiles at the walls. The best way to ensure square lines is to make a floor plan by drawing the walls of the room as accurately as possible on a sheet of grid paper. Be sure to include doorways and floor obstructions such as cabinets and fixtures. Find more…

VIDEO: How To install Ceramic Tiles On A Floor

How To Install Natural Stone Tile Flooring

Make the most of your home by replacing ceramic tile with natural stone tile flooring. The experts show how to remove the old flooring and install the limestone tile to give any room a facelift. Find more…

Installing Floor Tile

Step 1: Surface Preparation

Tile may be installed over most structurally sound substrates, if they are clean, smooth, dry and free of wax, soap scum and grease. Any damaged, loose or uneven areas must be repaired, patched and leveled. Remove any moldings, trim, appliances, etc., which could interfere with installation. Door jambs may be undercut for tile to slip under. Find more…

How to Install Floor Tile

Install cement board first if you’re dealing with just a subfloor. While it’s possible to lay tile directly on plywood subfloor, it’s certainly not recommended. Plywood subfloor won’t bond as surely with thinset as cement board will; neither will it provide as even and stable of a surface for the tile. Find more…

I hope that these procedures will help you in installing properly your floor tiles and will save you more time.